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La Joconde - Exposition Immersive

Cultural, Exhibition, Visual/graphic arts, Historic, Painting in Marseille 1er
13 Full-fare
  • A co-production by the Grand Palais Immersif

    (a subsidiary of the Rmn - Grand Palais) and the Musée du Louvre
    The Palais de la Bourse welcomes in its Grand Hall The Monna Lisa, an immersive exhibition, a fully digital multi- sensory experience of 600m2.
    Why is the Monna Lisa the most famous painting in the world? The answers to this apparently simple question are varied, complex and surprising, giving visitors an insight into part of the myth and above all into the work itself, beyond...
    A co-production by the Grand Palais Immersif

    (a subsidiary of the Rmn - Grand Palais) and the Musée du Louvre
    The Palais de la Bourse welcomes in its Grand Hall The Monna Lisa, an immersive exhibition, a fully digital multi- sensory experience of 600m2.
    Why is the Monna Lisa the most famous painting in the world? The answers to this apparently simple question are varied, complex and surprising, giving visitors an insight into part of the myth and above all into the work itself, beyond any false mysteries and clichés.

    The exhibition is an invitation to rediscover Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece through stories and sensory experiences that take place on different levels:
    - the circuit is punctuated with encounters with the “landscape-skin” that envelops the entire exhibition space. It immerses visitors in a place inspired by the works of Leonardo da Vinci (1452 - 1519), such as the Monna Lisa, Virgin of the Rocks and Saint Anne and offers interactive experiences for the public. The landscapes from these works come together and interact to create a panoramic world that brings the space to life. Here digital media, which is often thought of as a “cold” format, takes on an appealing sensitive and emotive dimension, with unusual graphic textures.

    - different visual tales recount the stories, anecdotes, modernity context and process behind this painting that has become an icon. Visitors meander through visual narratives that are simultaneously instructive, sensory and contemplative. Six very large-format digital projections convey the polysemy of Leonardo da Vinci’s work:

    1. The Origin of the Myth
    During his lifetime, Leonardo da Vinci made several portraits. At the height of his fame, at the age of 48, he began the portrait of Monna Lisa, who is also called «la Gioconda», a feminisation of her husband’s name. This painting became a challenge for Leonardo who wanted to give Monna Lisa a sense of life. Painted at life size, the Monna Lisa seems to be the most faithful representation of his quest for her creator. Leonardo da Vinci never handed over the portrait of his wife to Francesco del Giocondo, but kept it preciously close to him until his death, constantly perfecting it. It was at this price that he was able to render life on a poplar panel, to the point of making his contemporaries «tremble» at this miracle.

    2. A Living Portrait
    Like other painters before him, Leonardo da Vinci placed his figure in front of a landscape. While the Italian tradition had favoured the profile position up to that point, in the Northern European tradition the view is from three quarters and the gaze is turned towards the visitor. The framing offers a view of the hands coming to life. Above all, the master chose to paint the Monna Lisa with an expression that few artists before him had dared to portray: the smile. Leonardo da Vinci was therefore inspired by other pictorial traditions, in particular Flemish painting. But because he was able to capture the life of his model like no other, he created a masterpiece that still fascinates us five centuries later.

    3. Under Observation
    Every year, conservators, restorers and scientists also check its condition through visual examinations and highly sophisticated laboratory imaging. These analyses make it possible to know all the details of the painting, such as the shapeless brown area just above the parapet on the right, which is still an unfinished part of the painting.
    They also help us to better understand Leonardo da Vinci’s virtuoso painting technique and, in particular, his famous «sfumato» effect, in other words fading the contours and fusing the shadow and light to give Monna Lisa an impression of life.

    4. Monna Lisa Obsession
    The Monna Lisa was admired by his contemporaries during Leonardo da Vinci’s lifetime.
    From the moment of its creation, the Monna Lisa was copied and imitated. The painting was not yet finished when the young Raphael found in the Monna Lisa a powerful source of inspiration for his own work. It was then used for many portraits of women and men from all over Europe until the XIXth century. In the XXth century, artists ended up mocking or attacking the masterpiece that was becoming ever more famous.

    5. The Monna Lisa has been Stolen !
    The Monna Lisa was very famous among art lovers and cultured citizens on the eve of its flight in 1911. The thief did not choose her by chance. But it was her disappearance for more than two years that made the Monna Lisa a very popular image. The case fascinated press around the whole world, who reproduced her image to infinity, marking the beginning of a kind of Monna Lisa mania that still exists today.

    6. Monna Lisa Mania
    Since the flight of the Monna Lisa in 1911, the image of the painting has continued to spread throughout the world. Its success grew continuously from the second half of the XXth century. The face of the Mona Lisa still inspires artists, especially in the new expressions of land art and street art. It is also an icon used in advertising and reproduced on thousands of objects. Each of the projects offers different visions and animations tailored to the content of each one.
    - interactive devices continue these visual representations and are intended to encourage the visitor’s involvement. They can “touch” these digitised works, handle them, observe their texture and every minute detail as they have rarely been able to do before.

    - the different experiences on offer make for a dynamic way to transmit knowledge. Visitors can therefore truly encounter legendary masterpieces that are made accessible to all.

    The format of the Monna Lisa: an immersive exhibition invites a wide audience to experience an exhibition, and each individual’s relationship with this emblematic work, in a brand new way. This is no minor ambition, as it involves combining aesthetic, narrative and technological innovations while remaining mindful of accessibility and audience engagement. This creation offers a unique vision of Leonardo da Vinci’s work, both precise and well-researched, as well as a powerful and original artistic perspective.

    Visitors can expand and share their knowledge of the topics covered in the exhibition through the experiences and interaction offered by the fun, appealing and intuitive modules, where technological innovation lends itself to education and exploration.
  • Spoken languages
    • English
    • French
Services
  • Accessibility
    • Accessible for self-propelled wheelchairs
  • From March 10, 2022 to August 21, 2022
  • Full price
    13 €
  • Reduced price
    From 5 € to 11 €
  • Family pass
    From 9.40 € to 10.50 €
Schedules
  • From March 10, 2022
    until August 21, 2022
  • Monday
    10:00 AM - 8:00 PM
  • Tuesday
    Closed
    -
  • Wednesday
    10:00 AM - 8:00 PM
  • Thursday
    10:00 AM - 8:00 PM
  • Friday
    10:00 AM - 8:00 PM
  • Saturday
    10:00 AM - 8:00 PM
  • Sunday
    10:00 AM - 8:00 PM
  • In March On Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday from 10 am to 8 pm On Friday fom 10 am to 10 pm From April On Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday from 10 am to 8 pm On Friday fom 10 am to 10 pm
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